Pathway 4: Chapter 4 Homework Pack

Chapter 4: Subatomic Particles

Part A: Atomic NotationAnswers

Part B:†† Electron Configuration†† Answers

Part B1: Electron Configuration of IonsAnswers

Part C: Orbitals and Subshells of the Periodic TableAnswer

Part D: Spectroscopic Notation from Periodic TableAnswer

Part P: Periodic Properties Answer
Part P1:Electron Dot Structures using the Periodic Table Answers
Part P2:Periodic Ionic Character using the Periodic TableAnswers

Part S: Shapes of Orbitals
Part V: Chapter 4 Vocabulary Chapter 4 pages 123-124 Answers

 

 

Module Three: Part A†† Atomic Notation

 

†††††† †††††††††††††††††††††

 

Chapter 4 Part A: Atomic Notation

Given the following elements, atomic numbers, and mass numbers, State the number of electrons, protons, and neutrons in the following elements:

 

1.†††† 23Na11†††††††††††††††††††††††† ††††††††††††Protons††† = ______

Electrons = ______

Neutrons= ______

 

2.†††† 93Nb41††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Protons††† = ______

Electrons = ______

Neutrons= ______

 

3.†††† 20Ne10††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Protons††† = ______

Electrons = ______

Neutrons= ______

 

4.†††† 59Ni28††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Protons††† = ______

Electrons = ______

Neutrons= ______

 

5.†††† 19F9††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Protons††† = ______

Electrons = ______

Neutrons= ______

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4 Part B: Electron Configuration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

e-1rules1

 

 

 

 

e-1rules2

 

e-1rules3

 

Interactive Electron Configuration Web Site:

http://www.lsua.info/e_config/e-1instruct.html

Electron Configuration Rules Menu:

http://www.fccj.info/e_configMenu/e-1Menu.html

 

Check Your Answers. Click on the element on the periodic table:

http://fscj.me/e-1Spectroscopic/pc.html

Animation of Elements 1-112 filling electrons:

http://www.northcampus.net/ElectronConfiguration/SpectroscopicNotation/spectroscopicNotation.html

Chapter 4: Part B:†† Electron Configuration†††

Given the following elements and atomic numbers, use arrows to fill-in the electron configuration, then rewrite the configuration into the chemistís shorthand (spectroscopic Notation):

*remember 4/9 rule exceptions: Never 4/9 total d orbital electrons except for elements 41, 74, 78.

1.12C6†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:_____________________________________

Arorbital

 

2. 60Co27†† Chemist Shorthand:_____________________________________

 

 

e-1Kr

 

 


Chapter 4: Part B: Electron Configuration continued:

 

3.40Ca20†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

 

e-1Kr

 

4.52Cr24†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

 

e-1Kr

 

 

 

Chapter 4: Part B: Electron Configuration continued:

 

5.65Zn30†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

 

e-1Kr

 

6.85Nb41†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

 

 

e-1Xe

 

 

Chapter 4: Part B: Electron Configuration continued:

7.96Mo42†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

 

e-1Xe

 

8.180Au79†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

e-1Rn

 

 

 

B#1.Pd46†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

 

e-1Xe

 

B#2.Pt78†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

e-1Rn

 

 

 

 

B#3.Ag47††† †††††Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

 

e-1Xe

 

 

B#4.W74†††††††† Chemist Shorthand:____________________________

e-1Rn

 

 

Chapter 4 Part B1: Electron Configuration of Ions

††††††††††††

 

 

††††††††††† ††

Chapter 4 Part B1:†† Electron Configuration of Ions†††

Given the following ions, use arrows to fill-in the electron configuration of the ion, then rewrite the configuration into the chemistís shorthand:

 

1.†††† Cl1-ion††††† Chemist Shorthand: ___________________________

 

Arorbital

 

2.K1+ ionChemist Shorthand: _____________________________

 

 

e-1Kr

Remember positive ions have lost electrons from the neutral atom, while negative ions have gained electrons into the neutral atom.

Negative Ions are always isoelectronic with the Nobel Gas at the end of the period:

Nitride N3- Ion is isoelectronic with the Neon atom
Oxide ††O2- Ion is isoelectronic with the Neon Atom
fluoride F1- Ion is isoelectronic with the Neon Atom

Positive Ions are always isoelectronic with the Nobel Gas which ends the
previous period:

Aluminum Al3+ Ion is isoelectronic with the Neon atom
Magnesium Mg2+ Ion is isoelectronic with the Neon Atom
Sodium Na1+ Ion is isoelectronic with the Neon Atom

How about the Hydrogen atom which some classify as an element in a class by itself CAN become an ion (two different ways).

 

 

1.†††† H1-ion††††† Chemist Shorthand: ___________________________

Arorbital

2.H1+ ion Chemist Shorthand: _____________________________

Arorbital

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† ††

†††††††††††††††††††††††

†††††††††††††††††††††††††

 

 

 

Chapter 4: Part C Orbital Subshells & Periodic Chart:


A lot of students label the helium box 1p.

A lot of students label the 3d block of elements as 4d!

Chapter 4: Part C Orbital Subshells & Periodic Chart Sample Exam
On the periodic chart below show all the s, p, d and f block elements on the first six rows of the periodic table (Label each area beginning with 1s, 2s, 2p, etc):

periodic table

Group

1

2

 

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Period

 

1

1

 

2

2

3

4

 

5

6

7

8

9

10

3

11

12

 

13

14

15

16

17

18

4

19

20

 

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

5

37

38

 

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

6

55

56

*

71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

82

83

84

85

86

7

87
Fr

88
Ra

**

103
Lr

104
Rf

105
Db

106
Sg

107
Bh

108
Hs

109
Mt

110
Ds

111
Rg

112
Uub

113
Uut

114
Uuq

115
Uup

116
Uuh

117
Uus

118
Uuo

 

 

*Lanthanoids

*

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

 

 

**Actinoids

**

89
Ac

90
Th

91
Pa

92
U

93
Np

94
Pu

95
Am

96
Cm

97
Bk

98
Cf

99
Es

100
Fm

101
Md

102
No

 

 

 

Chapter 4 Part C1: Spectroscopic Notation from Periodic Chart
Sample #1: Write the spectroscopic notation of the Chlorine atom:
a. Chlorine is on the third row of the periodic table.
b. Neon is the Nobel Gas which ends the second period. Write [Ne] to begin the answer.
c. Look at the Periodic Table and Count the squares Left to Right on the third row to the chlorine atom.
d. write 3s2 after count 1,2
e. then 3,4,5,6,7 to Chlorine and write 3p5
Answer:[Ne] 3s23p5

Sample #2: Write the spectroscopic notation for Selenium atom:

On the fourth row of the periodic table you have to include the 3d orbitals when counting from left to right: #1,2=4s#; #3-12=3d10; #13,14,15,16=4p4

Answer:[Ar] 4s23d104p4

 

Chapter 4 Part C1: Spectroscopic Notation from Periodic Chart

1

IA

IIA

 

 

 

 

H

 

 

 

 

 

IIIA

IVA

VA

VIA

VIIA

He

2

 

 

 

 

 

*

 

 

 

 

*

 

 

 

 

Ne

3

 

 

IIIB

IVB

VB

VIB

VIIB

VIIIB

 

 

IB

IIB

 

 

 

 

 

Ar

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kr

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Xe

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rn

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M-3 C1: Spectroscopic Notation using the Periodic Chart

Given the Elementís Atomic Number, use the Periodic Chart above to write the Spectroscopic Notation for the following elements.. You may do it the long way showing all blocks of orbitals, or you may use the shorter method applying the square brackets around the Nobel Gas which indicates the complete inner filled electrons in the core (or Kernel).

i.e:[Ar] represents1s2 2s2 2p6 3s2 3p6 or the 18 electrons in the Argon core.

* In columns VIB and IB, you may have to apply the d4/9 Rule (Never 4/9 total d orbital electrons in any spectroscopic notation except Nb 41; W 74; and Pt 78)

  1. 1H†††††††† __________________________________________

 

  1. 30Zn††††† __________________________________________

 

  1. 35Br†††††† __________________________________________

 

  1. 74W††††††† ___________________________________________

 

  1. 8O†††††††† ___________________________________________

 

  1. 15P††††††† ___________________________________________

 

Chapter 4 Part F1:Electron Dot Structures using the Periodic Table

††††††††††††††

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Please Note how Helium is different. Why?

Chapter 4: Part F1††††††† Electron Dot Formulas of Atoms†††††††

Using the periodic chart, draw the electron dot formulas of the following elements (the numbers shown are the elementís atomic number and mass number):

 

1.6C12†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 6.†† 1H1

 

 

2.14Si28†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 7.†† 7N14

 

 

3.†† 9F19†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 8.†† 8O16

 

 

4.11Na23†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 9.†† 10Ne20

 

 

 

5.15P31††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 10.16S32

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4: Part F2 Periodic Ionic Character

††††††††††††

††††††††††††

06_01_Table

Chapter 4: Part F2†††††† Periodic Ionic Properties†††††††

Using a periodic chart, write the ionic character (monoatomic ionic charge) of the following elements: (The number before the element is its atomic number)

 

1.19 K†††† ________††††††††††† 6.††† 9F††††† _____

 

2.20Ca††† _______††††††††††††††††††††††††† 7.††† 1H††††† _____††† _____††

 

3.7N††††††† _______†††††††††††††††††††††††† 8.††† 16S†††† _____

4.17Cl††††† _______†††††††††††††††††††††††† 9.††† 10Ne†† _____

 

5.53I†††† †††______†††††††††††† ††††††† 10.†† 15P†††† _____†††††††

 

Chapter 4 Part F: Periodic Properties
Same as Chapter 3 Part P

Pathway 4: Chapter 4 Vocabulary
Fill the blanks with word or the words that best fit the description
Reference Chapter 4 Page 123-124.†††††††††††††††† ††††††††

1._____________________The total mass of an atom. The atomic mass of each element presented in the periodic table is the average atomic mass of the various isotopes of that element occurring in nature.

2. _____________________The dense, positively charged center of every atom.

3. _____________________The number of protons in the atomic nucleus of each atom of a given element.

4. _____________________The pattern of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation emitted by the atoms of an element, considered to be an elementís ďfingerprint.Ē

5. _____________________A representation of a system that helps us predict how the system behaves.

6. _____________________The nuclear charge experienced by outer-shell electrons, diminished by the shielding effect of inner-shell electrons and also by the distance from the nucleus.

7. _____________________The complete range of waves, from radio waves to gamma rays.

8. _____________________An extremely small, negatively charged subatomic particle found outside the atomic nucleus.

9. _____________________The arrangement of an atomís electrons within orbitals.

10. _____________________A schematic drawing used to arrange atomic orbitals in order of increasing energy levels.

11. _____________________The tendency of inner-shell electrons to partially shield outer-shell electrons from the attractive pull exerted by the positively charged nucleus.

12. _____________________The amount of energy needed to pull an electron away from an atom.

13. _____________________ Any member of a set of atoms of the same element whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons.

14. _____________________The number of nucleons (protons plus neutrons) in the atomic nucleus. Used primarily to identify isotopes.

15. _____________________An electrically neutral subatomic particle found in atomic nuclei.

16. _____________________Any subatomic particle found in an atomic nucleus. Another name for either proton or neutron.

 

 

17. _____________________A representation of an object on some convenient scale.

18. _____________________ A positively charged subatomic particle in atomic nuclei.

19. _____________________ A small, discrete packet of energy.

20. _____________________An integer that specifies the quantized energy level within an atom.

21. _____________________ A graphic representation of a collection of orbitals of comparable energy in a multielectron atom. A shell can also be viewed as a region of space about the atomic nucleus within which electrons may reside.

22. _____________________ A device that uses a prism or diffraction grating to separate light into its color components and measure their frequencies.